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Courses

The Training Institute offers courses for a variety of audiences including professionals, parents, and children. For information on pricing, duration, and logistics of hosting a training, please contact Annie Costello, MPH at 212-233-5500 x223 or training@nyspcc.org. Below are descriptions of our most frequent offerings; we are able to customize these trainings based on your needs.

 

Courses providing Continuing Education Contact Hours for social workers

Combatting Secondary Traumatic Stress
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CE Contact Hours Earned: 3.5                                                               Date: March 22, 2017; Time: 9:00 am- 12:30 pm
Cost: $65                                                                                                                            Instructor: Mary Pulido, PH.D.

To register click here

Summary:

This training session teaches clinicians and front-line workers about the symptoms and impact of secondary traumatic stress (STS). Working with clients after the violence of child abuse, domestic violence, homicide, or other critical incidents requires tremendous intensity and can be very draining. Front-line staff and clinicians are at risk for secondary traumatic stress (STS) due to the nature of their work. This training concentrates on recognizing, responding and preventing STS. The training includes reflective activities, self-assessment tools and interactive group exercises designed to engage the participants and create an atmosphere of support and involvement. The participants will gain concrete skills to utilize immediately to prevent and offset secondary traumatic stress.

Objectives:

  • Participants will learn the differences between stress, trauma, postraumatic stress disorder, secondary traumatic stress and “burn-out.”
  • Why do front line staff, mental health clinicians, law enforcement, and medical providers experience STS? The theory behind the development of STS and examples will be presented.
  • The participants will gain knowledge of self-care activities, worker-team activities and organizational activities that they can utilize in their daily work and personal life to prevent and manage STS.


The Importance of Program Evaluation: Determining What Works, What Doesn’t, and How to Fix it!
CE Contact Hours Earned: 3.5                                                                         Date: April 7, 2017; Time: 9:30 am- 1:00 pm
Cost: $65                                                                                                                               Instructor: Jacqueline Holloway, PH.D.

To register click here

Summary:

Participatory evaluation has the capacity to empower organizations and define successes, while involving a range of stakeholders in the process. Management and direct service providers, however, are often challenged with determining the efficacy of their programs, with evaluation representing an often misunderstood and neglected component of organizational planning.  This course will provide insight and instruction on the critical nature of program and service evaluation, which will assist in measuring and improving programs, as well as testing active models, and supporting funding efforts. This course will teach participants how to create logic models that reflect fundamental program goals, and how to use such models as a framework for developing measurable outcomes. These tools can also support social service providers in assessing clients’ progress and, in following, assist in informing decisions about interventions. Validated methods for collecting data (i.e. satisfaction surveys, standardized assessments, interviews, etc.), strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how these can be tailored to meet providers’ specific program needs will be presented.

Objectives:

  • Gain general knowledge of evaluation concepts and how these can be applied across settings
  • Learn the value of the logic model, and its role as a versatile tool that can support evaluation and assessment
  • Understand how to create better definitions and measures of treatment success
  • Gain an understanding of various data collection methods that are relevant to answering evaluation questions

Healing Trauma Through Movement and Art
CE Contact Hours Earned: 5                                        Date: TBD
Cost: $110                                                                      Instructor: Neha Reddy, LCAT, R-DMT and Dana Liebowitz LCAT, ATR-BC

Summary:

This course will provide an introductory review on the use or art and dance movement therapy in working with children with histories of interpersonal trauma. The participants will gain a broad understanding of using the body and art media for engagement, attunement, and strategies for supporting clients to develop adaptive coping strategies in response to trauma reactions. An overview of the clinical implications for the use of art materials and movement in therapy will be explored. Hands-on experientials will be part of the learning process. This course will be facilitated by two Licensed Creative Arts Therapists who specialize in dance movement and art therapy.

Objectives:

  • Participants will increase their capacity to use creative modalities in treating children with interpersonal trauma.
  • Participants will increase their ability to attune to non-verbal communication in both the therapist and client in order to gain insight into the therapeutic relationship.
  • Participants will learn about how non-verbal communication is linked to traumatic memory.
  • Participants will learn creative interventions focused on helping children repair boundary breaches and create safe containers for themselves.


Treatment for Children Who Have Been Sexually Abused
CE Contact Hours Earned: 5 Date: TBD ; Time: TBD
Cost: $110 Instructor:Paige Hamilton-O’Connor, LMHC

 

Summary:

Childhood sexual abuse frequently presents itself in a variety of clinical settings with children and youth. With or without sexual abuse specific training, clinicians are challenged to meet the needs of their clients.

This workshop will provide a framework from which to work when the impact of sexual abuse is presenting in the therapy form. This workshop will provide participants with knowledge about how sexual abuse impacts sexual development and will juxtapose sexual trauma indicators from normative sexual development. Stages of recovery and concrete strategies to assist children and families in the healing process will be will be reviewed and discussed, utilizing case examples from practice. The use of disclosure stories in creating opportunities for healing when children/youth are not believed or supported will also be discussed.

Objectives:

  • Participants will gain an understanding of the impact of sexual abuse on the sexual development of children.
  • Participants will learn to identify and understand the stages of recovery from childhood sexual abuse.
  • Participants will learn interventions to promote personal agency and optimize healing.
  • Participants will learn strategies to intervene when children’s disclosures are not believed or supported.


Healing from Multiple Traumas
CE Contact Hours Earned: 6

Summary:

Early childhood experiences of trauma, such as sexual abuse, physical abuse or the trauma of the separation from children’s primary attachment figures all play a formative role in children’s development. Facilitators will discuss the impact of these traumas on brain development, including how trauma memories are stored, and how trauma symptoms manifest. Facilitators will discuss the integration of a multi-modality approach into the treatment of children’s complex trauma. Facilitators will discuss the integration of a variety of interventions that are attachment-based, trauma informed, and access implicitly stored trauma memories.

Objectives:

  • Differentiate between isolated incidents of trauma and the impact of chronic or complex trauma on children’s development and sense of self.
  • Gain insight into the neurobiology of trauma, how trauma memories are stored, and how trauma symptoms manifest in children.
  • Apply interventions when working with children and complex trauma.
  • Integrate a multi-modality approach into their treatment of complex trauma.


Attunement: Building Blocks for Repairing the Parent-Child Bond

CE Contact Hours Earned: 4

Summary:

Parents separated from their children because of abuse and neglect can often struggle to     connect with both their children and the practitioners trying to help them.  This workshop     focuses on developing or enhancing the skill of attunement between the parent and the child, laying the groundwork to help restore the ruptured bond.  Often the skill of attunement begins with the process of the helping professional “tuning in” or connecting with the parent’s  emotional experiences.   When the practitioner places emphasis on caregiver   attunement  during sessions or home visits, helping professionals are modeling for parents how to notice and attend to their child’s emotional states.   The presenter will utilize a  theoretical grounding in attachment theory to support this work and discuss case examples that will illustrate specific interventions that support both caregiver attunement and parent-child attunement.

Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify the skills of attunement.
  • Participants will learn or review attachment theory fundamentals to ground them in the work of attunement.
  • Participants will be able to identify obstacles to attunement during sessions with caregivers and strategies to reduce barriers to attunement.
  • Participants will be able to develop strategies for maximizing parents’ ability to attune to the emotional behavioral needs of their children.


Managing the Complexities of Supervised Visitation for Children in Foster Care

CE Contact Hours Earned: 4                                                                                                                                                     
Summary:

Children in foster care are managing multiple traumas.  These traumas include the primary trauma that precipitated their placement into care—sexual abuse, physical abuse, emotional upheaval—as well as the trauma of the separation from their primary attachment figures.  These traumas lead to challenging behaviors that can become difficult to manage in a visitation setting.  This workshop will help participants gain insight into the neurobiology of trauma, how trauma memories are stored, and how trauma symptoms are expressed in the visitation room. The workshop will explain techniques, such as the decision dialogue, to create a collaborative relationship that will help to empower marginalized and disempowered parents and families.

Objectives:

  • Learn the components of the NYSPCC’s Supervised Visitation Program.
  • Develop an understanding of the role of healthy attachments in the healing process for children with trauma histories.
  • Review the decision dialogue technique to promote a child’s sense of personal agency.
  • Learn elements of The NYSPCC’s collaborative stance with clients and how to incorporate these techniques into your own work.
  • Participants will be able to develop strategies for maximizing parents’ ability to attune to the emotional behavioral needs of their children.

Supporting staff following Child Fatality and other Critical Incidents

Summary:

Clinicians working in child protection, foster care, domestic violence shelters, homeless shelters and social services encounter danger and trauma during the course of their workday. Crisis debriefing developed by The NYSPCC was incorporated into workplace standard Child Protective Services procedures in New York City, to reduce the excessive levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms and secondary traumatic stress symptoms resulting from child fatalities, severe cases of physical and sexual abuse, and violence in the field. This workshop will (a) describe the innovative process of the development and implementation of a crisis debriefing model designed to meet CPS needs following critical incidents, (b) report on focus group data (c) outline the protocol of the Restoring Resiliency Response (RRR) crisis debriefing model, and (d) present the participant evaluation data.

Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to differentiate between critical incident stress debriefing and the RRR Model, a strengths-based approach that integrates occupational supports and personal connections to enhance the restoration process.
  • Participants will review the RRR crisis debriefing protocol.
  • Participants will integrate workshop materials on traumatic stress reduction techniques and coping skills enhancement to offset the impact of child protection trauma cases.


Therapeutic Supervised Visitation for Children Exposed to Domestic Violence
CE Contact Hours Earned: 3

Summary:

Children in supervised visitation programs have often experienced a wide range of trauma, often including witnessing domestic violence. These children often present with a range of challenging behaviors that are often misunderstood or mislabeled. Understanding these behaviors as expressions of their traumatic experiences will help them to incorporate this knowledge to enhance the visiting process. This program will provide a working knowledge of how trauma memories are processed and how they are expressed. It will also illustrate how providing enhanced services, eg., Trauma Recovery Therapy, to children who have experienced trauma can support the healing process within the context of their relationship with the visiting parent in other parts of their life.

Objectives:

  • Develop an understanding of the impact of family violence on children.
  • Learn how supervised visitation can benefit families that have significant histories of violence or high conflict relationships.
  • Gain greater understanding of how supervised visitation, supplemented with enhanced therapeutic services, can support the healing of children who have witnessed family violence.


Child-Centered Interventions in Supervised Visitation 
CE Contact Hours Earned: 3.5

Summary:

This program will introduce clinical interventions, used in the context of supervised visitation to strengthen the parent-child bond, while remaining child-centered and child-focused. The program will show you how to build a strong collaborative relationship with all parents (custodial and visiting) in supervised visitation settings. The program will also recommend interventions at multiple levels: with the visiting parent, with the custodial parent, with the child, and jointly during visits between the parent and the child. The theories of attachment and attunement are heavily drawn on as the foundation of recommended clinical interventions.

Objectives:

  • Learn the components of The NYSPCC’s Supervised Visitation Program.
  • Effectively perform techniques, such as the decision dialogue, to promote a child’s sense of personal agency
  • Develop an understanding of the role of healthy attachments in the healing process for children with traumatic histories.
  • Develop strategies to manage difficult situations in the context of supervised visitation, such as visit resistance and divided loyalties.


For Child Welfare and Mental Health Professionals


  • Supervised Visitation Programs
  • Foster Care Case Workers/Supervisors
  • Children’s Services Case Workers
  • Family Services Workers
  • School Faculty and Administrators
  • Departments of Social Services/Child Welfare


Managing the Complexities of Children Affected by Trauma

Children who are exposed to multiple traumas such as domestic violence, sexual and physical abuse, emotional upheaval, and separation from their primary attachment figures can present with a range of challenging behaviors. Based on these behaviors, children are often misunderstood or mislabeled. This workshop will help participants understand these behaviors through a trauma lens. Participants will learn the value of creating collaborative relationships that will help to empower marginalized and disempowered parents and families. This program will:

  • Teach participants how trauma memories are processed and expressed
  • Enable participants to incorporate the trauma lens into the therapeutic process and promote effective interventions
  • Teach techniques such as the decision dialogue
  • Illustrate how providing enhanced therapeutic services can support the healing process


Helping Parents When Children Disclose Sexual Abuse

This workshop will teach participants how to engage non-offending parents after their children’s disclosure of sexual abuse. Parents can be helped in the process of working through their own feelings about the disclosure to support their child in the healing process. Participants will learn:

      • How to utilize disclosure stories to increase children’s sense of control over their trauma
      • Why healthy attachments are an integral part of the healing and recovery process
      • How to support parents in the parallel process of grief about the disclosure


Crisis Debriefing following Child Fatality and other Critical Incidents: The Restoring Resiliency Response Model

“First responders” to cases of severe child abuse, domestic violence, homicide, and disasters have extremely difficult and demanding jobs. Support systems, such as crisis debriefing, must be incorporated into standard procedures in order to reduce the excessive stress resulting from child fatalities, severe cases of physical and sexual abuse, and violence in the field and/or workplace. Developed by Mary L. Pulido, Ph.D., to support first responders following the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the Restoring Resiliency Response (RRR) model has been utilized by NYC Child Protective Services to alleviate the stress and anxiety associated with responding to child abuse and other critical incidents. This model differs from classical critical incident stress debriefing, in that it does not have an investigatory stance requiring staff to retell the incident. The primary goal of these sessions is to mitigate the impact of the critical incident and to accelerate the recovery process. Focus is placed on the individual’s ability to utilize support systems and past coping techniques. These sessions integrate education, emotional expression and cognitive restructuring. They also aim to enhance group cohesion and unit performance. This seminar will cover the process of developing a debriefing model to meet first responder needs; how to utilize the RRR protocol following a traumatic event, and techniques used in the sessions to reduce Post Traumatic Stress Symptoms.

Managing Secondary Traumatic Stress: A Training for Frontline Responders to Child and Family Trauma

“Managing Secondary Traumatic Stress,” teaches clinicians and front-line workers about the symptoms and impact of secondary traumatic stress. Working with clients after the violence of child abuse, domestic violence, homicide, or other critical incidents requires tremendous intensity and can be very draining on the staff. It takes a great deal of energy to stay connected with the client and witness their pain and suffering. Front-line staff are at risk for secondary traumatic stress (STS) due to the nature of their work. They may experience visual images of their clients’ traumatic stories intruding into their thoughts outside of work. They may have nightmares about their clients’ horrifying stories of fear and helplessness. They may feel estranged from their families and avoid situations that remind them of their clients’ traumatic experiences. Since STS can negatively affect a person’s life, this training concentrates on recognizing, responding and preventing STS. It targets intervention strategies at three levels: the worker, the worker-team and the organization. The training includes reflective activities, self-assessment tools and interactive group exercises designed to engage the participants and create an atmosphere of support and involvement. The participants will have concrete skills to utilize immediately to prevent and offset secondary traumatic stress. They will develop a stronger capacity for self-protection and self-care.

Managing for Resiliency: Preventing Institutional Secondary Traumatic Stress

This workshop teaches managers about secondary traumatic stress that impacts their clinical, case work, medical, legal and investigatory staff. All agencies that deal with a traumatized client base or who have suffered through traumatic incidents and are experiencing STS will find that it will take its toll on the workforce unless management implements effective steps to prevent and mitigate its effects. This workshop focuses on recognizing, responding and preventing STS targeting intervention strategies at the organizational level. Participants will receive an overview of stress, STS and burn-out; a ‘how to’ conduct a “stress audit” of their agency; hiring considerations to reduce attrition due to STS; and exercises to use in supervision to alleviate STS. Case examples of a resiliency support program for NYC Child Protective Services will be presented. Management and supervisory staff will obtain concrete skills to utilize immediately to prevent and offset STS and develop a stronger capacity for self-care on an agency-wide level.

Identifying and Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

This training informs mandated professionals of their legal obligation to identify and report suspected child abuse and neglect. The curriculum is the official syllabus developed by the New York State Office of Children and Family Services and approved by the New York State Education Department. A certificate of completion that meets the professional licensing requirements for doctors, social workers, teachers, and other professionals working with children will be issued upon completion. This two-hour curriculum can be customized to include agency specific policies and procedures. Participants will learn:

      • The definitions of abuse, neglect/maltreatment, and the behaviors associated with each
      • To recognize the common physical and behavior indicators of abuse and maltreatment
      • How to correctly report suspicions of abuse and maltreatment to the proper authorities
      • What their legal protections are in reporting and what the penalties are for failing to report


To learn more about enrolling in this course, please click HERE.

Programs for Children

Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Training

This program provides age appropriate information about child sexual abuse designed to teach children how to recognize when they may be at risk for abuse and how to seek help.
Specially-trained clinicians use puppets in role-play scenarios with children in grades K-3. The puppets help children recognize safe and not-safe touches and offer them strategies on what they can do if they encounter a not-safe situation. For students in grades 4-12, a more developmentally appropriate multi-media format using video, lecture, and discussion is used. All workshops are approximately one-hour in length, but can be modified to fit the specific needs of the host site. Children will learn:

      • The definition of child sexual abuse
      • The grooming tactics used by people who abuse to lower defenses of children
      • The variety of emotions related to being abused that stop children from disclosing
      • An action plan for what they can do if they have been sexually abused or feel they are at-risk of abuse


To learn more about The NYSPCC’s child sexual abuse prevention services for children, please click HERE.

Programs for Parents

Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Education for Parents

This educational workshop teaches parents about child sexual abuse (CSA) and how they can help keep their children safe from abuse. By dispelling common myths of CSA and using easy to grasp concepts, parents will learn how to talk to their children about CSA with less anxiety and more competence. Topics discussed include:

  • Dispelling common “myths” of child sexual abuse, including who are the most common perpetrators, what tactics are used, and what factors can put children at greater risk
  • Strategies for talking to children about sexual abuse prevention—what is appropriate information at different ages
  • Age appropriate sexual development in children, including what’s normal sexual expression and when to be concerned
  • Signs and symptoms of child sexual abuse
  • What you can do if your child has been abused—how to report an incident of child sexual abuse and managing emotions surrounding a disclosure


To learn more about The NYSPCC’s child sexual abuse prevention services for parents, please click HERE.

Child Safety Lectures

These lectures are appropriate for parent association meetings, community organization meetings, and other venues that encourage parent discourse and can be tailored for specific time frames. Lectures for parents discuss topics related to general child health and safety. Topics include:

  • How to decide when a child is ready to be left alone at home
  • Bullying: when your child is the victim and when your child is the bully
  • Internet safety— familiarizing parents with current terminology that their children are using; common strategies for keeping children safe on social media sites and chat rooms; recognizing when the virtual world is negatively impacting your child
  • Infant sleep safety


Sentencing Alternatives Family Education (SAFE)


In partnership with the Kings County (Brooklyn) District Attorney, we provide a psychoeducation program as an alternative to criminal adjudication for parents who are charged with their leaving children unattended at home or in public. For more information, please contact the Kings County District Attorney’s office directly at 718.250.2073.

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